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Maverick Sanchez
Maverick Sanchez

Buy Dinner Plate Dahlias



Dahlias never fail to impress. These flower-producing machines start blooming in midsummer, hit their stride in early August and then bloom their heads off, non-stop for 10 weeks straight. Though every type of dahlia has its own special charm, if you want the most direct route to WOW, you'll want to grow dinnerplate dahlias.




buy dinner plate dahlias


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It takes a big plant to producing such impressive flowers, so you can expect most dinnerplates to grow at least 4 feet tall. Their shrub-like size means the best place to plant them is at the back of a flower bed or in a cutting garden.


Dahlias grow best in good soil that is high in organic matter. Before planting, enrich the soil with compost and an all-purpose fertilizer, following package directions. Dinnerplate dahlias respond well to being fertilized regularly. Wait until the plants are a foot tall, then start feeding them at least once a month with a liquid all-purpose fertilizer, following the recommended dilution rates.


Dinnerplate dahlias should get about an inch of water per week. Infrequent deep watering is best. Try to target the root zone. Keeping the foliage as dry as possible will help deter slugs, snails and earwigs, as well as foliar diseases.


Dahlias have somewhat brittle stems than can be damaged by heavy wind and rain. With dinnerplates, the weight of the big flower heads (especially when waterlogged) can be enough to pull over an entire plant. Unless you're in a very sheltered location, it's important to stake the plants early and tie them in as they grow. You can read about a number of staking options HERE.


As with other dahlias, the more flowers you pick, the more you will get. Visit your dahlias at least a couple times a week, and bring the following three things with you every time: sharp scissors, a clean bucket with some water in the bottom for keepers, and a larger bucket, tubtrug or wheelbarrow for collecting spent blooms.


Cut your dahlias as soon as they open and before the back petals begin to soften. Try to cut nice, long stems, even when it means removing buds. Over time, this encourages the plant to produce longer stems.


Remove spent flowers in the same way, cutting a full stem rather than just nipping off the flower. Make sure to remove every flower that has passed its prime. Spent flowers collect moisture and become a home for pests and disease. This is especially true with the large blossoms of dinnerplates.


Dinner plate dahlia varieties grow tall, as well. Stems may reach up to 4 feet tall and tend to be very sturdy; that's no surprise, given that those huge flowers heads can get heavy. In fact, most dinnerplate dahlias benefit from staking when planting.


Here are planting instructions for dinner plate dahlia tubers. In spring, wait until the danger of frost has passed and the soil temperature reaches 60 degrees F. The right date depends on your specific USDA hardiness zone.


When growing dinner plate dahlias, placing plants in optimal growing conditions is key. Let's start with the soil; dinnerplate dahlias prefer rich, well-drained soil. If your soil is heavy or clay, amend it with sand, peat or compost to loosen it and improve drainage.


To get the biggest blooms, disbud your dinner plate dahlia. Find the central bud in a flower cluster, then remove the two smaller buds next to it. Even though your plant will produce fewer flowers, the huge flower heads will be even larger.


If you live in USDA hardiness zone 8 to 10, your dinnerplate dahlia will come back each year. If you live in hardiness zone 7 or lower, you will need to dig up and store dahlia tubers over the winter.


Summer Blooming Bulbs, including popular varieties such as gladiolus and dahlias, are planted in the spring and bloom in the summer. Most of these bulbs are tropical and require warm weather to be planted. There must not be any danger of frost and your ground temperature must have reached 55 degrees Fahrenheit before planting. Manyof our summer blooming bulbs can be planted as perennials in zones 9-10 (zone 8 if mulched), but should be treated as annuals in cooler climates. You can lift them and store them in the fall, or bring patio pots inside before frost. See page 15 of our Planting Guide for a bulb depth planting illustration. Read our article about How To Grow Dahlias.


Growing Dahlias: Plant Dahlia tubers after spring frosts in good garden soil with full sun. Dahlias must be protected from high winds, so we suggest you position them against a wall or be ready to stake them. Keep the plants well-watered and free of bugs, applying flower fertilizer as they grow. Your dahlias will be in full bloom by July or August, with the enormous flowers continuing to bloom until frost. As frost threatens, pull up the roots and trim off the stems. You can store the tubers in a cool dry place until the following spring.


If you are looking for a glamorous and spectacular Dahlia, you have found it! Award-winning Dahlia 'Babylon Rose' is an eye-catching Dinnerplate Dahlia with huge and magnificent pastel-rose blossoms adorned with dark pink splashes. The fully double flowers, up to 8 in. wide (20 cm), are shockingly gorgeous. Blooming massively from midsummer until frost, this dahlia grows up to 40-44 in. tall (100-110 cm) and is an excellent choice to create a lovely garden display or for bouquets.


One of the largest dahlias, Dahlia 'Emory Paul' produces an abundance of rich rosy-purple flowers with wonderful wavy petals. The fully double flowers, up to 12-14 in. wide (30-35 cm), are borne atop strong stems from summer to frost and provide an amazing focal point in the garden or in a vase. This dahlia grows up to 3-4 ft. tall (90-120 cm) and is a knockout as a cut flower or tall, back of the border dahlia.


Highly honored throughout the world, Dahlia 'Lavender Perfection' is an eye-catching Dinnerplate Dahlia with huge and magnificent lavender-pink blossoms. The fully double flowers, up to 8-10 in. wide (20-25 cm), are shockingly gorgeous. Blooming massively from midsummer until frost, this classic dahlia grows up to 40 in. tall (100 cm) and is an excellent choice to create a lovely garden display or for bouquets.


Stealing the display with its zestfulness, Dahlia 'Motto' is an eye-catching Dinnerplate Dahlia with huge and magnificent fire-bright orange blossoms that blend into brilliant gold at their heart. The fully double flowers, up to 7-8 in. wide (17-20 cm), are borne on sturdy stems that are great for cutting. Blooming massively from midsummer until frost, this dahlia grows up to 36 in. tall (90 cm) and pops in the sunny border or in flower arrangements.


Stealing the show with its exceptional coloring, Dahlia 'Tartan' is an eye-catching Dinnerplate Dahlia with huge and luscious blossoms, a striking mix of deep burgundy and brilliant white. The gently ruffled, velvety wine-red petals are beautifully edged and tipped with white. The fully double flowers, up to 7-8 in. wide (17-20 cm), are borne on sturdy stems that are great for cutting. Blooming massively from midsummer until frost, this dahlia grows up to 36 in. tall (90 cm) and pops in the sunny border or in flower arrangements.


Dahlia 'Thomas Edison' is an eye-catching Dinner Plate Dahlia with huge and magnificent, deep purple blossoms. The fully double flowers, up to 8 in. wide (20 cm), are borne atop strong, sturdy stems. Blooming prodigiously from midsummer until frost, this dahlia grows up to 3-4 ft. tall (90-120 cm). It looks amazing when mixed with bright red or tangerine dahlias or grown among tall ornamental grasses. Great for bouquets and stunning at the back of the border.


Fabulous planting partners for dahlias, ornamental grasses help create incredibly beautiful planting combinations. In contrast with dahlias which boldly inject bright colors and broad-petalled flowers in the garden, grasses contribute their beauty in a more subtle fashion through their transparency, luminosity, texture, and seasonal changes.


Injecting color, drama, and late-summer fireworks in the garden, dahlias look fabulous on their own or combined with other plants. Many are graceful and integrate well into most borders, creating appealing planting combinations and providing interest from mid-summer until the first frost.


The rich variety of their flower colors, shapes and sizes added to their extensive blooming season have turned dahlias into a popular addition to our landscapes. There are thousands of varieties of dahlias (!!!) and they are all classified by the shape, size and color of their flowers.


Hi Donna. It is hard to say exactly. There are a few reasons why dahlias won't bloom. They need at least 6 hours of sun a day. They also need even moisture, so if you are not watering them enough they won't bloom. Also over fertilizing can be a problem for them since they will grow lots of leaves but no flowers. Carol


Imagine large dinnerplate blooms of dahlias with yellow centers surrounded by light salmon hues. That is what you will get with the Tyrell Dahlia. Turn you rimagination into reality, and order your Tyrell Dahlias today!


Dinner plate dahlia blooms often must be protected from pests like Japanese beetles. The best way to protect the blooms is to use a physical barrier like netting or silk bags over the flower heads. You can also pick the beetles or other large pests like slugs off the plant whenever observed.


Dinnerplate dahlias are the showiest of them all. If you're eager to have ginormous blooms that are, quite literally, as big as a dinner plate (up to 25cm across), then this category is the one to choose. With a wide selection of striking colours and varieties to choose from, you're sure to find varieties to suit your personal taste. Grow dinner plate dahlias in full sun, and plant them towards the back of borders or mass them for a totally awe-inspiring display. Dinner plate dahlias will need well-drained soil and plenty of sunshine. Stock up on canes to support them, since those gigantic flowers are so heavy.


FULL SUN TO PARTIAL SHADE Dahlias grow from tuberous roots which are hardy in Zones 6 and higher. They are indigenous to the Mexican Central Plateau and Highlands. Thomas Edison, one of the oldest dahlias still in commercial production, introduced in 1929, produces huge (7-9 in.) striking, deep purple blossoms on 36-40 in. plants. One of the most beautiful dahlias ever produced. 041b061a72


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